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The Hard Infrastructure of the Future

Maximising Availability of Subsea Connectivity

Submarine cables have become a major economic factor in the last 35 years. Without submarine cables, it is difficult to imagine how the current global economy could function.

Almost all internet traffic travels via submarine wires. Cisco predicts that by 2023, two-thirds of the world’s population will be online. Global internet users are expected to grow by 1.4 billion by 2023, to 5.3 billion. (Cisco, 2021).

The surge in data demand driven by bandwidth-intensive applications like video and cloud services is also driving submarine cable deployments. Due to satellite data services’ low bandwidth and high latency, underwater fiber optic cables are the only viable option.

Around 406 submarine cable systems exist or are planned globally. The internet giants own and operate most of the submarine cables. For example, Google Inc. invested $300 million in 2014 in a trans- Pacific underwater fiber optic cable. MAREA, the trans-Atlantic submarine cable, involved Facebook and Microsoft. Google and Facebook joined forces to fund the Apricot project, a submarine cable network connecting Japan, Singapore, and other Asian countries. (Submarine Cable Map, 2021)

Undersea cables in indonesia

Undersea cables in indonesia

In Indonesia, telecommunication companies own and operate networks of undersea cables. Telkom is one of the owners as well as backbone operators in Indonesia. In the January-June 2021 period, Telkom extended its fiber-optic network to 1,898 km. Until the end of June 2021, the length of Telkom’s underwater fiber-optic network reached 169,833 km, 310 times the straight-line distance from Sabang, Indonesia’s westernmost town, to the country’s farthest eastern point, Merauke.

Several years ago, the undersea cable landing points had yet to reach the most remote areas, as the locations were not profitable for the companies to invest hefty amounts on such expensive infrastructure.

So, the Indonesian government stepped in to build the backbone infrastructure using the public-private partnership scheme. Starting operations in 2019, Palapa Ring, the name of the backbone network, is divided into three segments: Palapa Ring East, Palapa Ring Middle, and Palapa Ring West.


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The Hard Infrastructure of the Future

Maximising Availability of Subsea Connectivity

Submarine cables have become a major economic factor in the last 35 years. Without submarine cables, it is difficult to imagine how the current global economy could function.

Almost all internet traffic travels via submarine wires. Cisco predicts that by 2023, two-thirds of the world’s population will be online. Global internet users are expected to grow by 1.4 billion by 2023, to 5.3 billion. (Cisco, 2021).

The surge in data demand driven by bandwidth-intensive applications like video and cloud services is also driving submarine cable deployments. Due to satellite data services’ low bandwidth and high latency, underwater fiber optic cables are the only viable option.

Around 406 submarine cable systems exist or are planned globally. The internet giants own and operate most of the submarine cables. For example, Google Inc. invested $300 million in 2014 in a trans- Pacific underwater fiber optic cable. MAREA, the trans-Atlantic submarine cable, involved Facebook and Microsoft. Google and Facebook joined forces to fund the Apricot project, a submarine cable network connecting Japan, Singapore, and other Asian countries. (Submarine Cable Map, 2021)

Undersea cables in indonesia

Undersea cables in indonesia

In Indonesia, telecommunication companies own and operate networks of undersea cables. Telkom is one of the owners as well as backbone operators in Indonesia. In the January-June 2021 period, Telkom extended its fiber-optic network to 1,898 km. Until the end of June 2021, the length of Telkom’s underwater fiber-optic network reached 169,833 km, 310 times the straight-line distance from Sabang, Indonesia’s westernmost town, to the country’s farthest eastern point, Merauke.

Several years ago, the undersea cable landing points had yet to reach the most remote areas, as the locations were not profitable for the companies to invest hefty amounts on such expensive infrastructure.

So, the Indonesian government stepped in to build the backbone infrastructure using the public-private partnership scheme. Starting operations in 2019, Palapa Ring, the name of the backbone network, is divided into three segments: Palapa Ring East, Palapa Ring Middle, and Palapa Ring West.


DOWNLOAD FOR MORE INSIGHT

READ MORE


Appraising Fixed Broadband Reliability
13 Dec 2021

Fixed broadband is the wired technology that delivers high-speed internet access over a fixed cable or fiber-optic connection. Fixed broadband penetration has been increasing steadily in most regions around the globe.


Soft Infrastructure, Human-centric Data Economy
13 Dec 2021

Digital skills are becoming an important requirement for employment across the economy, as it moves through the process of digital transformation.